Elymus canadensis is a perennial found in areas such as N. America - in most areas except the far south. Recorded, but not yet naturalized in N. Europe[50]. A member of the Gramineae family, Elymus canadensis L is also known by its common name of Canadian Wild Rye. The perennial can grow to a height of 0.75 meters and up to 1 meters wide. The preferred habitat of Dry sandy gravelly or rocky soil[43]. Thickets and open woods in limestone and sandy clay soils in Texas[274]., with LMH soil and N moisture levels. .

Canadian Wild Rye is a zone 3 hardy plant that has medicinal uses - the medicinal usage rating of Canadian Wild Rye is 0(Binary/Image)

Elymus canadensis is 0 plant, whose flowers bloom typically in 7 - 8, and which is pollinated by Wind.

The plant has an edibility rating of 2Seed - cooked[105, 161, 177]. It can be ground into a flour and used to make bread. Quite fiddly to use, the seed is small and difficult to separate[K]. The seed was an important item of food for the Paiute Indians of south-western N. America[183].

Cultivation tips: An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils, preferring a sandy soil and a sunny position[1, 162]. Plants can flower too late to ripen their seed in Britain, especially in the western half of the country[K]. A polymorphic species[1].

. The plant should best be propagated by Seed - sow mid spring in situ and only just cover the seed[162]. Germination
should take place within 2 weeks. If the supply of seed is limited, it can also be sown in mid spring in a cold frame. Only just cover the seed. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in summer[K] Division in spring or summer[162]. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Seed - cooked[105, 161, 177]. It can be ground into a flour and used to make bread. Quite fiddly to use, the seed is small and difficult to separate[K]. The seed was an important item of food for the Paiute Indians of south-western N. America[183].