Rhamnus grandiflora is a deciduous shrub found in areas such as W. Asia - Caucasus to N. Iran. A member of the Rhamnaceae family, Rhamnus grandiflora C.Y.Wu. ex Y.L.Chen does not go by a known (to us) common name. The shrub can grow to a height of 4 meters and up to 4 meters wide. The preferred habitat of the plant, with LMH soil and SN moisture levels. .

The plant is a zone hardy plant that has no known (to us) medicinal uses - the medicinal usage rating of the plant is 0.

Rhamnus grandiflora is a non flowering plant which is pollinated by Insects.

Known hazards of the plant: Although no specific mention of toxicity has been found for this species, there is the suggestion that some members of this genus could be mildly poisonous[65].

The plant has an edibility rating of 1This species produces large crops of blackcurrant-sized fruits regularly at Kew and other sites. They have a reasonable flavour and are worthy of further investigation into potential edibility[K].

Cultivation tips: We have very little information on this species but it is growing well at the Hillier Arboretum in Hampshire and seems very healthy. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in any reasonably good soil[11]. The species in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200].

. The plant should best be propagated by Seed - best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed will require 1 - 2
months cold stratification at about 5° and should be sown as early in the year as possible in a cold frame or outdoor seedbed[200]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, and grow them on in the greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame[113]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, autumn in a frame. Layering in early spring[4].

This species produces large crops of blackcurrant-sized fruits regularly at Kew and other sites. They have a reasonable flavour and are worthy of further investigation into potential edibility[K].