There are all kinds of layouts that you can use for a vegetable garden. Not all of them are, however, suitable for your needs. Firstly, you have to consider how much space you have and if it is appropriate for the types of vegetables that you wish to grow.

Types of Vegetables to Grow

Experts strongly advise vegetable gardeners to rotate the types of crops they grow each year. This will prevent pests from figuring out what kind of vegetables you typically raise, which could make them come back every year and causing damage to your garden. It will also improve the health and quality of your soil, making it rich with all the essential nutrients.

Here are several types of vegetables that you try growing alternately.

  • Leafy vegetables - lettuce, artichokes, broccoli and cauliflower, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and celery
  • Fruiting vegetables - tomato, sweet corn, beans and peas, eggplant, pepper, pumpkins and melons
  • Root vegetables - regular and sweet potato, carrots, beetroot, garlic and onions, leeks, radishes, and turnips
  • Perennial vegetables - horseradish and asparagus
  • Fungi - specific types of mushrooms and truffles
  • Vegetables that require a specialized gardening method - okra, ginger, wasabi, and plantain

When growing vegetables, you should also take note of how “hardy” they are or how well they can adapt to extreme weather conditions. Below is a list of vegetables according to their level of hardiness.

Level 1 vegetables are those that can be easily damaged by frost and are

unsuitable for growing in zones where evening temperatures fall below 55F.

Examples: cucumbers, squash, eggplants, and watermelons

Level 2 vegetables are slightly hardier, being capable of cooler than usual night temperatures but unable to handle frost.

Examples: corn, tomato, bush and Lima beans

Level 3 vegetables can withstand damage of light to moderate frosts.

Example: cauliflower, carrots, lettuce, and beets

Level 4 vegetables are the hardiest of them all and caused by frost but are unable to grow in zones with deep winters.

Example: spinach, radish, onion, mustard, cabbage, and broccoli

Types of Vegetable Garden Layouts

Here are the most commonly used layouts for vegetable gardens. You do not have to follow any of them, though. You can simply use these designs as a guideline for making the most out of your vegetable garden plot.

Row Layout

Vegetables are planted in parallel rows, with one row or a group of rows representing one or a particular group of vegetables. This layout is best for corn and beans. Unfortunately, it has a lower yield rate compared to other layouts and it requires you to spend a lot of time weeding out your garden. A garden tiller will be very helpful for creating vegetable rows in your garden.

Bed Layout

This layout requires you to create a bed, which is basically a plot developed at an elevated area. All kinds of vegetables can be planted in a single bed and without having to design any rows. With vegetable garden beds, you get a higher yield rate, fewer weeds to deal with, and more efficient use of space. The elevated height of garden beds also allows them to enjoy better drainage, aeration, and minimal soil compaction.

The only disadvantage to using a bed layout is that it cannot be too big that you will have a hard time watering and growing plants in the innermost part of the bed. Also, building a garden bed definitely takes more time and skill to set up, but it can be easier if you purchase a raised garden bed kit.

Spot Layout

If you do not have much space to begin with, then you can simply choose the best spot in your backyard and plant everything there. It will mean a much lower yield rate, but it is also something that can be easily created and maintained. Its smaller size also ensures that you grow all your plants in optimal condition.

The spot layout is also sometimes referred to as the container layout. This is because most of the time, spot layouts can only accommodate vegetables that can be raised in pots or containers throughout their lives.

 


Vegetable Gardening

Vegetable gardening always begins with a choice of what kind of vegetables does your weather and available space allow for growing. If you have never tried gardening before, then it is best to start with either a small manageable plot or even just try to grow one or two vegetables first in containers.

If, however, you are already an old hand at gardening or you have sufficient experience, then a 16 x 20 foot garden plot may be sufficient if there are 3 or 4 members in your household.

Selecting the Ideal Location

Here are a couple of tips to keep in mind when finding the best location for your vegetable garden.

  • Look for a spot that gets a minimum of 8 hours of full sunlight.
  • The ideal spot must also have shelter from strong winds, which can cause your plants to either dry out or incur slight to moderate damage.
  • The land must be well irrigated.

How to Improve Soil for Vegetable Gardening

  • Vegetable gardening requires the finest quality of soil since its produce is something you are likely to consume.
  • Autumn is the ideal time to prepare your soil for vegetable gardening.
  • Clear away all weeds and debris such as sticks, rocks, and waste.
  • Rake the ground until it completely smooth.
  • Use a garden tiller for creating rows or beds. Make sure you do so one at a time.
  • If your soil is low on organic matter, add a sufficient amount of manure or compost, which can prove drainage, fertility, and texture.

Where to Plant Vegetables

Here are general tips you can use when planting an assortment of vegetables in a single plot or bed.

  • The tallest crops should be placed at the back of the row or bed or the furthest end of the garden. Vegetables should then be planted in descending height, with the smallest or root crops planted in front. This way, you can always perform a visual check on all your crops from your house.
  • There must be two to three feet of space between each row.
  • Planting must start from the north point and all the way to the south.

A List of Basic Tools for Vegetable Gardening

All of these can be easily ordered online or purchased from any major gardening store in your area.

  • Safety gear - this includes wide-brimmed sun hats with cinches or locks, safety gardening gloves, eco-friendly waste bags, knee mats or patches, and overalls
  • Watering hose, spray can and bottle for watering your vegetables
  • Trowel - for digging smaller holes and weed removal
  • Shovel - choose the round-headed type to have an easier time digging larger holes
  • Wheelbarrow or cart - for transporting heavy supplies and equipment all over your garden
  • Pitchfork - for creating a heap of compost
  • Rake - for clearing away debris and spreading mulch
  • Shears for pruning dead and damaged parts of plants

 

More Tips on Vegetable Gardening

Here are additional tips that you should keep in mind to enjoy the best results from vegetable gardening.

Always have one to two inches of organic mulch spread around every vegetable. This will prevent your vegetables from getting contaminated in any way as well as help in limiting weed growth.

Compost should be added 2 or 3 weeks prior to planting. You may do this while performing other tasks necessary for preparing your soil. Adding compost in advance is important since it requires a good amount of time before it can become fully stabilized and integrated with your soil. Compost should be added in each hole before a vegetable is planted. This will help increase the quality of your produce.

Save space by training vegetables for vertical growth. Tomatoes and squashes can grow vertically on trellises and canes if trained at an early stage to do so.

Grow onions, garlics, chrysanthemums and chives in your vegetable garden. They are not only useful in various numbers of ways in the kitchen but they can also help repel pests and insects.

Water your plants early in the morning. This will give them the rest of the day to fully absorb the nutrients from the water, making some of your produce ready for picking by night fall.

When it comes growing fruit and vegetables, the experience of traditional gardeners really come into their own. We hope to provide you with insight on vegetable gardens so you too can experience the joys of flavour rich, pesticide free fruit and vegetables - just like your grandparents used to grow.

Vegetable gardening has traditionally been done in long rows. This allows machinery to cultivate the fields, increasing efficiency and output.

Over the past century new techniques have emerged such as raised bed gardening, which has increased yields from small plots of soil without the need for commercial, energy intensive fertilizers. Modern hydroponic farming also yields very high yields in greenhouses without using any soil, but expends much more energy.

Manures and fertilisers are essential for the growth of good vegetables. Since nitrogen, phosphate and potash are removed from the soil in large quantities by vegetables, they must be replaced regularly to maintain soil fertility. Generally speaking, the soil will not become deficient in these if animal manures and compost are used in conjunction with the artificial fertilisers.

Because different types of vegetables have different food requirements, it is customary to group together those which need similar soil conditions. Thus, Potatoes respond well on freshly manured soil, but fresh animal manure would cause distorted and forked roots of Carrot, Parsnip and Beet.

The legumes (Peas and Beans) require less nitrogen than brassicas (Cabbage, Cauliflower etc.) while the latter require more lime than other vegetables. In the initial preparation prior to sowing, the same complete plant food may be used for all crops. This is the type usually known as No. 5 (5 % nitrogen, 15 % phosphate, 5 % potash). Some refinements of this also contain a trace element balance. Such a mixture aids germination, good root growth and a strong plant frame.

Then for Cabbage, Cauliflower, Spinach, Silver Beet, or Lettuce (which require more nitrogen) supplementary liquid feeding at fortnightly intervals of Sulphate of Ammonia or better still complete water-soluble plant foods will supply the correct balance of nutrients.

It also helps maintain a balance of fertility to plan so that no one group of plants occupies the same piece of ground for two years in succession. This means carrying out a system of crop rotation, which also ensures that a soil pest or disease

There are all kinds of layouts that you can use for a vegetable garden. Not all of them are, however, suitable for your needs. Firstly, you have to consider how much space you have and if it is appropriate for the types of vegetables that you wish to grow.

Types of Vegetables to Grow

Experts strongly advise vegetable gardeners to rotate the types of crops they grow each year. This will prevent pests from figuring out what kind of vegetables you typically raise, which could make them come back every year and causing damage to your garden. It will also improve the health and quality of your soil, making it rich with all the essential nutrients.

Here are several types of vegetables that you try growing alternately.

  • Leafy vegetables - lettuce, artichokes, broccoli and cauliflower, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and celery
  • Fruiting vegetables - tomato, sweet corn, beans and peas, eggplant, pepper, pumpkins and melons
  • Root vegetables - regular and sweet potato, carrots, beetroot, garlic and onions, leeks, radishes, and turnips
  • Perennial vegetables - horseradish and asparagus
  • Fungi - specific types of mushrooms and truffles
  • Vegetables that require a specialized gardening method - okra, ginger, wasabi, and plantain

When growing vegetables, you should also take note of how “hardy” they are or how well they can adapt to extreme weather conditions. Below is a list of vegetables according to their level of hardiness.

Level 1 vegetables are those that can be easily damaged by frost and are unsuitable for growing in zones where evening temperatures fall below 55F.

Examples: cucumbers, squash, eggplants, and watermelons

Level 2 vegetables are slightly hardier, being capable of cooler than usual night temperatures but unable to handle frost.

Examples: corn, tomato, bush and Lima beans

Level 3 vegetables can withstand damage of light to moderate frosts.

Example: cauliflower, carrots, lettuce, and beets

Level 4 vegetables are the hardiest of them all and caused by frost but are unable to grow in zones with deep winters.

Example: spinach, radish, onion, mustard, cabbage, and broccoli

Types of Vegetable Garden Layouts

Here are the most commonly used layouts for vegetable gardens. You do not have to follow any of them, though. You can simply use these designs as a guideline for making the most out of your vegetable garden plot.

Row Layout

Vegetables are planted in parallel rows, with one row or a group of rows representing one or a particular group of vegetables. This layout is best for corn and beans. Unfortunately, it has a lower yield rate compared to other layouts and it requires you to spend a lot of time weeding out your garden. A garden tiller will be very helpful for creating vegetable rows in your garden.

Bed Layout

This layout requires you to create a bed, which is basically a plot developed at an elevated area. All kinds of vegetables can be planted in a single bed and without having to design any rows. With vegetable garden beds, you get a higher yield rate, fewer weeds to deal with, and more efficient use of space. The elevated height of garden beds also allows them to enjoy better drainage, aeration, and minimal soil compaction.

The only disadvantage to using a bed layout is that it cannot be too big that you will have a hard time watering and growing plants in the innermost part of the bed. Also, building a garden bed definitely takes more time and skill to set up, but it can be easier if you purchase a raised garden bed kit.

Spot Layout

If you do not have much space to begin with, then you can simply choose the best spot in your backyard and plant everything there. It will mean a much lower yield rate, but it is also something that can be easily created and maintained. Its smaller size also ensures that you grow all your plants in optimal condition.

The spot layout is also sometimes referred to as the container layout. This is because most of the time, spot layouts can only accommodate vegetables that can be raised in pots or containers throughout their lives.