Viola canadensis is a perennial found in areas such as N. America - Saskatchewan and south to Nebraska and the Rocky mountains. A member of the Violaceae family, Viola canadensis L is also known by its common name of Canada Violet. The perennial can grow to a height of 0.4 meters and up to 0.25 meters wide. The preferred habitat of Rich soils in deciduous woods and forests in the mountains[43, 62, 187]., with LMH soil and SN moisture levels. .

Canada Violet is a zone hardy plant that has medicinal uses - the medicinal usage rating of Canada Violet is 1A tea made from the roots has been used in the treatment of pain in the bladder region[222, 257]. The roots and leaves have traditionally been used to induce vomiting, they have also been poulticed and applied to skin abrasions and boils[222].

Viola canadensis is 0 plant, whose flowers bloom typically in 4 - 7, and which is pollinated by Insects.

The plant has an edibility rating of 3Young leaves and flower buds - raw or cooked[62, 177, 183]. A very mild flavour, when boiled as greens they are best mixed with other stronger tasting leaves[183]. When added to soup they thicken it in much the same way as okra[62, 85, 159]. Flowers - raw[62, 85]. The leaves are a good tea substitute[62, 85, 183].

Cultivation tips: Easily grown in any fertile soil in full sun or partial shade[233]. The plant prefers a cool position[233] in a moist well-drained humus-rich soil in
partial or dappled shade and protection from scorching winds. Tolerates sandstone and limestone soils but becomes chlorotic if the pH is too high. The plant prefers a pH between 6 and 6.5. Hardy to about -25°c[187]. All members of this genus have more or less edible leaves and flower buds, though those species with yellow flowers can cause diarrhoea if eaten in large quantities[62, 85, 159]. This species has mainly white flowers that are at first yellowish at the base then turn violet[222]. There are some named varieties selected for their ornamental value[200].

. The plant should best be propagated by Seed - best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. Sow stored seed in early spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Division in the autumn or just after flowering. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions, though we have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.

Young leaves and flower buds - raw or cooked[62, 177, 183]. A very mild flavour, when boiled as greens they are best mixed with other stronger tasting leaves[183]. When added to soup they thicken it in much the same way as okra[62, 85, 159]. Flowers - raw[62, 85]. The leaves are a good tea substitute[62, 85, 183].