Plantago coronopus is an annual/perennial found in areas such as Coasts of west and south Europe, including Britain, south and east from Sweden to N. Africa, W. Asia. A member of the Plantaginaceae family, Plantago coronopus L is also known by its common name of Buck's-Horn Plantain. The Annual/perennial can grow to a height of 0.3 meters and up to 0.25 meters wide. The preferred habitat of Sandy or gravelly soils and cracks in rocks, in sunny places in dry soils usually near the sea[4, 17]., with LM soil and N moisture levels. .

Buck's-Horn Plantain is a zone 6 hardy plant that has medicinal uses - the medicinal usage rating of Buck's-Horn Plantain is 2The leaves are antiperiodic and ophthalmic. They are used as a remedy for ague and sore eyes[4]. Plantain seeds contain up to 30% mucilage which swells up in the gut, acting as a bulk laxative and soothing irritated membranes[238]. Sometimes the seed husks are used without the seeds[238].

Plantago coronopus is 0 plant, whose flowers bloom typically in 5 - 7, and which is pollinated by Wind.

The plant has an edibility rating of 3Young leaves - raw or cooked[2, 13, 132, 183]. High yielding[27]. One of the nicer tasting members of this genus, the leaves are fairly tender and have a slight bitterness[K]. Some people blanch the leaves in boiling water for a few seconds before using them in salads in order to make them more tender[183]. This leaf is one of the ingredients of 'misticanze',
a salad mixture of wild and cultivated leaves that originated in the Marche region of Italy[183].

Cultivation tips: Succeeds in any moderately fertile soil in a sunny position[200]. A polymorphic species[132]. This plant has sometimes been cultivated for its edible leaves[2, 52]. An important food plant for many caterpillars[30].

. The plant should best be propagated by Seed - sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in early summer. A sowing can be made outdoors in situ in mid to late spring if you have enough seeds.

Young leaves - raw or cooked[2, 13, 132, 183]. High yielding[27]. One of the nicer tasting members of this genus, the leaves are fairly tender and have a slight bitterness[K]. Some people blanch the leaves in boiling water for a few seconds before using them in salads in order to make them more tender[183]. This leaf is one of the ingredients of 'misticanze', a salad mixture of wild and cultivated leaves that originated in the Marche region of Italy[183].